When we fill an entire aperture with a natural form, design issues tend not to occur within the image. and therein lies the importance of studying natural design. Gouache, 6” diameter circles on vellum. Painted while looking through a microscope. I liked them enough to make them prints, too.
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When we fill an entire aperture with a natural form, design issues tend not to occur within the image. and therein lies the importance of studying natural design. Gouache, 6” diameter circles on vellum. Painted while looking through a microscope. I liked them enough to make them prints, too.
Zoom Info
When we fill an entire aperture with a natural form, design issues tend not to occur within the image. and therein lies the importance of studying natural design. Gouache, 6” diameter circles on vellum. Painted while looking through a microscope. I liked them enough to make them prints, too.
Zoom Info
When we fill an entire aperture with a natural form, design issues tend not to occur within the image. and therein lies the importance of studying natural design. Gouache, 6” diameter circles on vellum. Painted while looking through a microscope. I liked them enough to make them prints, too.
Zoom Info
When we fill an entire aperture with a natural form, design issues tend not to occur within the image. and therein lies the importance of studying natural design. Gouache, 6” diameter circles on vellum. Painted while looking through a microscope. I liked them enough to make them prints, too.
Zoom Info
When we fill an entire aperture with a natural form, design issues tend not to occur within the image. and therein lies the importance of studying natural design. Gouache, 6” diameter circles on vellum. Painted while looking through a microscope. I liked them enough to make them prints, too.
Zoom Info

When we fill an entire aperture with a natural form, design issues tend not to occur within the image. and therein lies the importance of studying natural design. Gouache, 6” diameter circles on vellum. Painted while looking through a microscope. I liked them enough to make them prints, too.

On second thought, I don’t think I want to see (let alone partake in the creation of) a realistically rendered drawing of the Tsuritama cast in custom speedos.

I like the juxtaposition of somewhat flat, super stylized shameless anime fanart to actual studies. Once I study even more, I wonder if I will draw Really Fancy shameless anime fanart. (laughs)

Bulldog skull studies. The challenge was to draw with only line, focusing on using it to define the planes of the subject. The trick is to use an eraser to shape the charcoal marks, or in other words “draw with the eraser,” following the form of the subject to create an illusion of depth.
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Bulldog skull studies. The challenge was to draw with only line, focusing on using it to define the planes of the subject. The trick is to use an eraser to shape the charcoal marks, or in other words “draw with the eraser,” following the form of the subject to create an illusion of depth.
Zoom Info
Bulldog skull studies. The challenge was to draw with only line, focusing on using it to define the planes of the subject. The trick is to use an eraser to shape the charcoal marks, or in other words “draw with the eraser,” following the form of the subject to create an illusion of depth.
Zoom Info
Bulldog skull studies. The challenge was to draw with only line, focusing on using it to define the planes of the subject. The trick is to use an eraser to shape the charcoal marks, or in other words “draw with the eraser,” following the form of the subject to create an illusion of depth.
Zoom Info
Bulldog skull studies. The challenge was to draw with only line, focusing on using it to define the planes of the subject. The trick is to use an eraser to shape the charcoal marks, or in other words “draw with the eraser,” following the form of the subject to create an illusion of depth.
Zoom Info

Bulldog skull studies. The challenge was to draw with only line, focusing on using it to define the planes of the subject. The trick is to use an eraser to shape the charcoal marks, or in other words “draw with the eraser,” following the form of the subject to create an illusion of depth.